Tag Archives: autobiography

Swindell Swindle

In this excerpt from David Brinkley’s autobiography, titled simple David Brinkley: A Memoir, ©1995, he remembers his first job, at the age of twelve, in the 1930s: Mr. Swindell explained to me that the A&P sold butter in two forms– “print” butter in quarter-pound sticks wrapped in paper printed with the dairy’s name, and a …

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And I Knew Before I Answered

In this excerpt from Wunnerful, Wunnerful! the Autobiography of Lawrence Welk, © 1971, Welk discusses the grief and disorientation he felt when he lost his mother: It was in Pittsburgh that I got the telegram. “Come home at once. Mother is dying.” I stood holding the telegram in my hands, sick at heart, remembering a …

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Vulnerable Human Beings

In this excerpt from Wunnerful, Wunnerful! the Autobiography of Lawrence Welk, © 1971,  Welk discusses the lesson he learned when his first band left him to tour on their own: Some of the bewilderment and pain began to lift the moment I returned (home) to Yankton, and a day or so later when I dropped …

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Brushed My Hair Back

In this excerpt from Wunnerful, Wunnerful! the Autobiography of Lawrence Welk, © 1971, he talks about how hard it was for him to express his emotions verbally: I had always thought my mother was beautiful, but she looked especially so to me as she held (my newborn daughter) Shirley for the first time. She settled …

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Change, Conquer or Exploit

Excerpted from Plain and Simple:  A Woman’s Journey to the Amish by Sue Bender, ©1989: “Why is the Amish land so beautiful?” I asked one evening. “What makes it feel special? I’m a city person, Eli, and I didn’t see a cow till I was twelve. I don’t know where the sun sets, or how …

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The Things They Hold Precious

Another excerpt from If I Knew Then What I Know Now– So What? by Estelle Getty, ©1988: As a student of human nature, I love to people-watch. It’s also essential to my craft– I’ll pick things up I see on the street and incorporate them into my roles. It was my idea, for instance, for …

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Noah’s Ark Syndrome

Excerpted from If I Knew Then What I Know Now– So What? by Estelle Getty, ©1988: I’ve always felt that loneliness, not age, is the real killer. I get a lot of letters from women who tell me how difficult life is– they’re widowed and alone and scared and sick– and the show (The Golden …

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Dorothy

In this excerpt from his autobiography Have Tux, Will Tavel, ©1954, Bob Hope is discussing the successful Road To… movie series: When Bing (Crosby) and I are working out our lines for the next take, she (Dorothy Lamour) just stands there and listens. Once in a while she’ll say, “How about a line for me?” …

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3

Three autobiographies I’ve read that made me intensely dislike the author: Time Enough To Win by Roger Staubach Have Tux, Will Travel by Bob Hope It’s in the Book, Bob by Bob Eubanks

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Subtle

From Bob Hope’s autobiography Have Tux, Will Tavel, ©1954: I’d discovered that I was a success if could lead with a joke the audience didn’t grab right away– a good, solid, big joke with a certain amount of subtlety to it, one that would challenge the audience and let them know right away that they …

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The Persistence Of

Rod McKuen’s father abandoned his mother before he was born, and in the early 1970s McKuen hired a team of private investigators to find him.  The search is documented in the autobiographical Finding My Father: One Man’s Search for Identity, ©1976. One fascinating aspect of the search was how poor people’s memories are.  Four women …

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A Lesson in Genetics

In this excerpt from Blue Highways © 1982, author William Least Heat Moon recalls a conversation in the Desert Den Bar in Hachita, New Mexico: (Bartender) Mrs. (Virginia) Been turned to me. “He’s a real cowboy. Horse, lasso, branding iron.” “Not many of us left except you count the ones that tells you they’s cowboys. …

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