Tag Archives: history

1934

It’s 84 years later.  Things should be a lot different. They aren’t. “God invited us all to come and eat and drink all we wanted. He smiled on our land and we grew crops of plenty to eat and wear. He showed us in the earth the iron and other things to make everything we …

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Paper, paper everywhere…

In this excerpt from A Journey For Our Times © 1983,  Harrison E. Salisbury describes visiting the Russian front after the battle to free the Crimea: We went to the Crimea, the Germans finally driven out, corpses bobbing on the rock shores of the slim peninsula where the last stand was made, and over the …

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“Hide me.”

“You can really learn something about a person when he’s put into circumstances in which civilized values place his own identity, even his very being, in jeopardy… I often think: How would a friend with whom you’ve drunk a lot of vodka and had a lot of fun respond when one morning you plant yourself …

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The Good War

I worked with a man named Charlie years ago in Houston. I’m sorry, I’ve forgotten his last name. When we met he was nearing retirement age. He was one of the very first Americans into Berlin at the close of World War II. He told me there were dead bodies everywhere; soldiers, civilians, dogs, horses, …

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Just Like Buddy and Waylon

In her autobiography On Reflection, actress Helen Hayes recounts an incident from her childhood between theater producer Charles Frohman and actor John Drew Jr.: I saw Mr. Drew angry with Mr. Frohman only once, from a great distance and with good reason. The producer cabled that he was returning from a European business trip. “Stay …

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“Nice lot of counting machines!”

I’m reading Jacob Riis autobiography and came to a part where he mentioned knowing Hans Christian Anderson.  I was amazed- then I remembered that when he wrote this book in 1901 he was already an old man, recounting a story from his youth.  It’s written in such an easy, conversational style that I lost track …

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“A Great Doer”

Photographer Jacob A. Riis published his autobiography, The Making of an American, in 1901.  He died 13 years later in 1914, and a eulogy written by Theodore Roosevelt was included as an introduction when the book was republished in 1924. I think this says a lot about both men: It is difficult for me to …

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World War One and Motörhead

An excerpt from America’s Part in the World War by Richard J. Beamish, ©1919: A name blazoned in letters of gold will live forever in American History:  CHȂTEAU-THIERRY.  Around it will cluster records of immortal valor, deeds of heroism that will to the end of time shed luster upon the American soldiers who there checked …

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1919

  One of the books I’m reading currently is America’s Part in the World War by Richard J. Beamish, ©1919.  Here’s a brief excerpt: How the flower of America’s youth, answering the call to battle, sprang to the support of the colors; how America’s army of democracy was raised almost overnight, trained in an incredibly …

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The Fan

In an interview with H. Allen Smith, recounted in his book Low Man On A Totem Pole, ©1941, Sally Rand said she invented the Fan Dance as a way to skirt obscenity laws.  Nudity was allowed on stage as long as the person was motionless, but nude dancing was prohibited.  Her plan was to conceal …

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If

“It will be important, if the Democratic party succumbs to Wall Street domination, to have a new party to let the people of the world know that those who believe in peace and understanding still have some means of expression… It would provide evidence that the United States has not gone completely imperialistic and psychopathic.”  …

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90

“If you treat people right they will treat you right — ninety percent of the time.”  ~Franklin D. Roosevelt  (source) I like the little disclaimer at the end.  🙂

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