Tag Archives: Project Gutenberg

Dash

I heard a Fly buzz – when I died By Emily Dickinson I heard a Fly buzz – when I died – The Stillness in the Room Was like the Stillness in the Air – Between the Heaves of Storm – The Eyes around – had wrung them dry – And Breaths were gathering firm …

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Me, too.

“He held himself to standards that left him discontented with himself.”  ~Leo Rosten, about Michel de Montaigne Michel de Montaigne’s writings are in the public domain, and may be downloaded or read online for free at Project Gutenberg, HERE.

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Furniture and Ornaments and Games

Excerpted from The Emerald City by L. Frank Baum, ©1910: Altogether there were more than half a million people in the Land of Oz– although some of them, as you will soon learn, were not made of flesh and blood as we are– and every inhabitant of that favored country was happy and prosperous. There …

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Subtly Censoring Content

“Let us consider two authors (Edgar Rice Burroughs and L. Frank Baum) whose works were burned in our American society during the past seventy years.  Librarians and teachers did the burning very subtly by not buying.  And not buying is as good as burning.  Yet, the authors survived.”  ~Ray Bradbury All of L. Frank Baum’s …

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The Prophet

I recently discovered The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran is in the public domain. You can download a free copy from Project Gutenberg, HERE.  It’s available in plain text, Kindle, and Epub formats, and in HTML for online reading.

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The Gentleman

The first time I read The Gentleman from San Francisco by Ivan Alekseevich Bunin, I was completely unimpressed.  I tossed onto the pile to be donated to charity. A few hours later I wanted to re-read a passage, so I brought it back, read it, then returned it to the pile. The next day there …

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I was a stranger, and

Matthew 25: 34-46: Then shall the King say unto them on his right hand, Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world: For I was an hungred, and ye gave me meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink: I was a stranger, and …

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Conscience and Remorse

Conscience and Remorse by Paul Laurence Dunbar “Good-bye,” I said to my conscience– “Good-bye for aye and aye,” And I put her hands off harshly, And turned my face away; And conscience smitten sorely Returned not from that day. But a time came when my spirit Grew weary of its pace; And I cried: “Come …

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‘Neath the old apple tree

The Old Apple Tree by Paul Laurence Dunbar There’s a memory keeps a-runnin’ Through my weary head to-night, An’ I see a picture dancin’ In the fire-flames’ ruddy light; ‘Tis the picture of an orchard Wrapped in autumn’s purple haze, With the tender light about it That I loved in other days. An’ a-standin’ in …

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Time

“A mistake constantly made by those who should know better is to judge people of the past by our standards rather than their own. The only way men and women can be judged is against the canvas of their own time.”  ~from Education of a Wandering Man: A Memoir by Louis L’Amour ©1989 Paul Laurence …

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Reading List

Three classic books that are better than any of the movies: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson (download) Frankenstein; Or, The Modern Prometheus by Mary Shelley (download) A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens (download) These three are all far more subtle than any movie interpretation I’ve seen.  The …

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We had still duties which we ought to perform…

In this excerpt from Frankenstein; Or, The Modern Prometheus by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, ©1818, young Victor Frankenstein mourns the death of his mother: She died calmly, and her countenance expressed affection even in death. I need not describe the feelings of those whose dearest ties are rent by that most irreparable evil, the void that …

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