Tag Archives: The Beats

“I’m tired of waiting for Godot.”  ~Lawrence Ferlinghetti, in Junkman’s Obligato ©1958

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Coca-Colonization

Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s travel journals read, not surprisingly, very much like his poetry. This excerpt from Writing Across the Landscape (© 2015) records his thoughts attending a poetry conference at the Universidad de Concepción in Chili, in the early part of 1960: The impression I have is that a great fat omnivorous crab named United States …

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A Beautiful Place

I came across a trove of Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s books at the used book store. I have to be in the right frame of mind to enjoy Beat Poetry.  (Ferlinghetti denies he is a Beat, but at the very least there’s a kinship.)  Anyway, I guess that’s where I am at the moment.

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Whatever It Was

Let’s go Come on Let’s go Empty our pockets And disappear. Missing all our appointments And turning up unshaven Years later Old cigarette papers stuck to our pants leaves in our hair. Let us not worry about the payments anymore. Let them come and take it away whatever it was we were paying for. And …

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Why Come Back?

“Every time I meet William Burroughs, I feel I’m in the presence of a feisty corpse. As a living person he seems rather bored. I asked him if he would go to the moon. ‘Of course,’ he replied. ‘I’d go anywhere. I’d leave the solar system if they came to get me in a flying …

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A New Significance

In this excerpt from a letter to Scott,  Zelda Fitzgerald describes her mental illness in words that sound very much like Beat Poetry: In Paris, before I realized that I was sick, there was a new significance to everything:  stations and streets and facades of buildings– colors were infinite, part of the air, and not …

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*sigh*

Tom the Dancing Bug is on the web HERE.

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Leaning

“We all go to Heaven leaning on the arm of someone we helped.”  ~Neal Cassady, quoted in Desolation Angels by Jack Kerouac ©1965

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Desolate

The voice in Jack Kerouac’s Desolation Angles is definitely different than the voice of On The Road or Dharma Bums.  There are passages where he almost sounds like E.E. Cummings (but maybe it’s just the parenthesis).

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We Could Be Heroes

From (of all places) Rotten.com: In fact, (Jack) Kerouac too styled his friend a hero, specifically the “new American Hero”. Recall that in the 50s and 60s, many young people felt smothered by the American Dream. Adult America was obsessed with living the Good Life, and with protecting the American way of life — rescued …

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Lover Man

Excerpt from On The Road by Jack Kerouac, ©1955: I huddled in the cold, rainy wind and watched everything across the sad vineyards of October in the valley.  My mind was filled with that great song “Lover Man” as Billie Holiday sings it; I had my own concert in the bushes.  “Someday we’ll meet, and …

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Hit The Road, Jack

I’m re-reading The Dharma Bums and On The Road, and although I still love the way Jack Kerouac writes I find myself less enchanted by his philosophies. Depending upon the kindness of strangers for your livelihood and indulging every whim as soon as it arises doesn’t sound like freedom and enlightenment.  It sounds like infantilism.

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